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Map of ohio coronavirus alert levels by county.
OHIO DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, August 14:

a photo of Frank LaRose
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, August 13:

A photo of John Kasich
ALLEGRA BOVERMAN / NHPR

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, August 12:

JON RIDINGER / WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Kent State, Akron and the rest of the Mid-American Conference won’t be playing sports this fall. The MAC became the first major conference to postpone the season because of the coronavirus pandemic. The Big Ten conference officially scrapped its season on Tuesday. 

WKSU sports commentator Terry Pluto says the decision is an opportunity for the MAC to take a step back and address schools' huge football program deficits. 

A photo of Governor Mike DeWine
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, August 11:

Picture of Akron Zips Football game.
UNIVERSITY OF AKRON

For months, college football adminstrators and universities expressed cautious optimism on their ability to play safely in the coranaviris pandemic.

However, two conferences have decided that they won't be playing this fall. On Saturday, the Mid American Conference announced it would postpone the fall sports season until spring 2021. This followed earlier news of FBS independent UConn canceling its football season last week.

Graph of Ohio COVID-19 rates for August 10, 2020.
OHIO DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, August 10:

photo of Firestone Country Club
FIRESTONE COUNTRY CLUB

The Bridgestone Senior Players Championship returns to Firestone Country Club later this week. It will feature 81 top PGA Tour Champions including World Golf Hall of Famer Ernie Els who will compete in the 2020 tournament raising money for those in need due to the coronavirus. But spectators will be missing, due to safety concerns about the spread of the virus.

a photo of Summit Lake
ROSALIE MURPHY / THE DEVIL STRIP

Before the pandemic, the city of Akron, like many Rust Belt cities, was taking a close look at ways to engage the community, and draw in new residents.

A new Knight Foundation study took a deep dive into 26 metro areas, including Akron, to learn what increases residents’ connection to the city and improves quality of life.

police on the courthouse steps
JOSH TROCHE / USED BY PERMISSION

Northeast Ohio is not exempt from the rising tide of gun violence sweeping across the nation.

But the pandemic has brought challenges hindering the work of Summit County law enforcement agencies.

Akron Police report the department’s rate for solving murders this year is 69 percent higher than the national average.

photo of Mike DeWine
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, August 7:

Keith Freund / WKSU

As moratoriums on evictions put in place during the coronavirus pandemic expire and evictions kick back in, people who rent are facing a whole new set of challenges, brought on by a global pandemic and increased housing instability. As part of our Informed Communities project looking at evictions, we take a closer look at some of the challenges and the help that’s available.

Picture of University of Akron campus
UNIVERSITY OF AKRON

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, August 6:

Nepali couple in a garden
SHANE WYNN / AKRON STOCK

The spread of Coronavirus has been more pervasive in some regions than others.

In Akron, the north side of town has experienced greater spread than anywhere in the city. North Akron is the city’s international neighborhood, housing immigrants and refugees from Nepal, Bhutan, Iraq, Afghanistan, the Congo and many others. But one group is working to keep the virus in check.

Picture of Dick Goddard
WJW

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, August 5:

Erik Drost / Wikimedia Commons

The NFL season starts September 10 when the defending Super Bowl champion Kansas City Chiefs host the Houston Texans.

But because of the pandemic, there are new safety protocols, limited practices and no pre-season games this year.

WKSU sports commentator Terry Pluto says this season could be a rough one for teams led by new coaching staffs like the Cleveland Browns.

Longtime Cleveland TV meteorologist Dick Goddard passed away Tuesday morning. He was 89 years old.

Goddard tested positive for COVID-19 in June. 

Goddard gave his final signoff in November 2016, while surrounded by colleagues at WJW-TV, a company he started working for in 1966.

photo of steve burns
LORDSTOWN MOTORS

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, August 4:

Image By and Shared from The Cleveland Browns
/ CLEVELANDBROWNS.COM

This season, the Browns have joined an elite group of five NFL teams. These teams are among a few in the league that now have women in key positions on the coaching staff. 

For the Browns, it's Callie Brownson, hired by new head coach Kevin Stefanski to be the chief of staff. 

The 30-year old Brownson grew up in Virginia and blazed a trail to her current position.

photo of Coronavirus blood vial
SHUTTERSTOCK

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, July 30:

Picture of Cleveland blast furnace.
ARCELORMITTAL

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, July 29:

Sean Fitzgerald / WKSU

Major League Baseball’s pandemic-shortened season is just getting started, but if television ratings are any indication, sports-starved fans are hungry for major league sports.

According to WKSU sports commentator Terry Pluto, without fans in the stands at Progressive Field, TV viewership is key this year for the Cleveland Indians.

With less than 100 days until the 2020 presidential election, Ohio's 18 electoral votes are in play.

The state went for President Trump in 2016, and Ashtabula County is one reason why.

Picture of HEC sign.
CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, July 28:

A photo of the Portage County Randolph Fair.
ANDREW MEYER / WKSU

Medina County Fair

The Medina County Agricultural Society Board of Directors met Sunday evening, and with the help of the Medina County Health Commissioner, voted to put on a limited fair Aug. 3 to  9, with only Junior Fair activities that will not be open to the public. 

 

Fairgoers will be limited to the Junior Fair participants and up to 10 selected guests. 

The board also voted to remove rides and grandstand events and limit concessions, free entertainment and merchants. 

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